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What is the equals() method of the IntBuffer class in Java?

Talha Ashar

Grokking Modern System Design Interview for Engineers & Managers

Ace your System Design Interview and take your career to the next level. Learn to handle the design of applications like Netflix, Quora, Facebook, Uber, and many more in a 45-min interview. Learn the RESHADED framework for architecting web-scale applications by determining requirements, constraints, and assumptions before diving into a step-by-step design process.

The equals() method of the IntBuffer class in Java checks if an IntBuffer object is equal to another object.

For the equals() method to consider two objects as being equal, the following conditions must be satisfied:

  1. Both objects should have the same type of elements.
  2. Both objects should have the same number of elements.
  3. Both objects should have the same sequence of elements.

The process is illustrated below:

Note: An IntBuffer object can only be considered equal to another IntBuffer object, not any other type.

To use the equals() method, you will need to import the IntBuffer class into your program, as shown below:

import java.nio.IntBuffer

The prototype of the equals() method is shown below:

public boolean equals(Object ob)

Parameters

The equals() method takes a single mandatory parameter, i.e., the object to compare with the buffer.

Return value

If the object is equal to the IntBuffer, then the equals() method returns true; otherwise, it returns false.

Example

The code below shows how the equals() method can be used in Java:

import java.nio.*;
import java.util.*;
class equalsMethod {
public static void main(String[] args) {
// initialize IntBuffer instance
IntBuffer bufferOne = IntBuffer.allocate(3);
IntBuffer bufferTwo = IntBuffer.allocate(3);
IntBuffer bufferThree = IntBuffer.allocate(3);
DoubleBuffer bufferFour = DoubleBuffer.allocate(3);
int values[] = {2, 1, 6};
// add values to buffer
for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
bufferOne.put(values[i]);
bufferTwo.put(values[i]);
bufferFour.put(values[i]);
}
bufferThree.put(2);
bufferThree.put(1);
// Print buffers
System.out.println("BufferOne is: " + Arrays.toString(bufferOne.array()));
System.out.println("BufferTwo is: " + Arrays.toString(bufferTwo.array()));
System.out.println("BufferThree is: " + Arrays.toString(bufferThree.array()));
System.out.println("BufferFour is: " + Arrays.toString(bufferFour.array()));
// Compare buffers
if(bufferOne.equals(bufferTwo))
{
System.out.println("\nBufferOne and BufferTwo are equal.");
}
else
{
System.out.println("\nBufferOne and BufferTwo are not equal.");
}
if(bufferOne.equals(bufferThree))
{
System.out.println("BufferOne and BufferThree are equal.");
}
else
{
System.out.println("BufferOne and BufferThree are not equal.");
}
if(bufferOne.equals(bufferFour))
{
System.out.println("BufferOne and BufferFour are equal.");
}
else
{
System.out.println("BufferOne and BufferFour are not equal.");
}
}
}

Explanation

First, multiple IntBuffer objects and a DoubleBuffer object are initialized through the allocate() method. Each buffer has the capacity to store 33 elements.

Next, a for-loop adds values to the buffers through the put() method.

The objects bufferOne and bufferTwo are identical in terms of their element types, the number of elements, and the sequence of elements. Therefore, the equals() method in line 3333 returns true.

On the other hand, bufferOne and bufferThree have a different sequence of elements, as the last element of both objects is different. Consequently, the equals() method in line 4242 returns false.

Finally, although bufferOne and bufferFour have the same sequence and number of values, the types of the elements differ, as bufferFour is a DoubleBuffer. Therefore, the equals() method in line 5151 returns false.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Talha Ashar
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Grokking Modern System Design Interview for Engineers & Managers

Ace your System Design Interview and take your career to the next level. Learn to handle the design of applications like Netflix, Quora, Facebook, Uber, and many more in a 45-min interview. Learn the RESHADED framework for architecting web-scale applications by determining requirements, constraints, and assumptions before diving into a step-by-step design process.

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